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New Jellies and Fish on View in Northern Pacific Gallery New Jellies and Fish on View in Northern Pacific Gallery
Juvenile sailfin sculpin. | © Anitza Valles
Flowerhat Jelly | Robin Riggs

Animals

April 27, 2016

Two species new to the Northern Pacific gallery are now on view at the Aquarium. Flower hat jellies (Olindias formosa), previously on display in the Wonders of the Deep gallery, are now on exhibit near the other sea jellies in the Northern gallery.

Flower hat jellies are found in waters off southern Japan, Argentina and Brazil in the Western Pacific Ocean. They reach about 6 inches (15 cm) wide and has multicolor tentacles trailing from a translucent pinstriped bell. The flower hat jelly lives close to the ocean floor, often in eelgrass and seagrass or among kelp fronds. Its powerful sting is used to immobilize prey, including small fish and invertebrates. Its sting is painful to humans, but not deadly.

In the Jewels of the Northern Pacific exhibits near the giant Japanese spider crabs, juvenile sailfin sculpins (Nautichthys oculofasciatus) are now on display in the upper left tank. These fish were born here at Aquarium about one month ago and are about an inch long.

Sailfin sculpins are found in the Eastern Pacific Ocean from Alaska to Southern California. They get their name from their sail-like first dorsal fin. They live primarily in inshore areas at about 360 feet (110 meters) deep, mostly on rocky bottoms and areas with algae. These nocturnal fish swim with their dorsal fins extended in front of their heads.