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Whales Galore!

The Flamboyant Cuttlefish

Sea Turtles and Breaching Whales!

Tripod the Urban Sea Turtle

The Summer has Begun!

The Magic Wand of Animal Training

The Blues are coming in and Bryde’s too!

Sand Dollar Feeding Frenzy

Frisbee Catching Sea Lions

Feeding Frenzies Cont.

Ollie-Wan Kenobi: Jedi Otter

Breaching Everywhere!

“OTTER-LY” CUTE

Fin Whale News

Cup-stacking Otter

First Blue Whale!

To Hold a Shark Close

Unexpected Visitors and More!

An Inspirational Vision-Impaired Seal

Why So Many Grays?

A Feast Fit for a King or Otter

Killer Whales Unite!

10 Thing You Should Know About the Urban Sea Turtle of Los Angeles

The Great Barrier Reef

One Thousand Three Hundred and Twenty-Five!

Grays Galore!

How in the World Do You Sample a Whale?

Who Knew You Could Cuddle a Shark?

The Hunters Return!

Listening to Whales: Hydrophones, Headphones, and Singers in the Sea

My Aquarium Year In Pictures

Update: Killer Whales and Grays!

A Whale in the Crosshairs

Do You Want to Build A Snowman… for the Sea Otters?

A Killer Holiday Season

Sea Lions Versus Seals

Fintastic Fall and Killer Whales!

Lorikeet Feeding Frenzy Time Lapse

Welcome to Peregian Beach – Gearing Up for BRAHSS 2014

A Very Humpbacky October

Otter Party Time-lapse

An Aquarium Explorer Abroad

Just Under the Surface

Hooray for “Olliewood”

Lunge-a-Palooza

From Chips to Brays

So Long For Now!

Whales AND Sharks!

Avery the Penguin’s Chick

It’s Your Turn to Build Enrichments for the Animals!

The Blues Continue to Amaze!

What People Think I Do

One Tough Customer

What a Summer We are Having!

Sea Otters Using Ice to Keep Warm

Aquarium Animals Support Recycling

Hug-A-Shark

Soccer Sharks

Finally, Confirmation of a Mystery Whale from 2011!

Curious Penguins

Pinniped Encounters at the Aquarium of the Pacific

Urban Sea Turtle ID

Therapeutic Enrichment

Et tu, Brude?

Walking with Penguins at the Aquarium of the Pacific

Feeding Frenzy

Extinct in the Wild

May of Grays

Enrichment Challenge! Part 3

The Force is Strong with this Otter

April Recap & the Return of the Killer Whales!

Enrichment Challenge! Part 2

Penguins are Habit-Forming

Enrichment Challenge!

Skim Hunting Osprey

Penguin Party!

Parenting and Predation

Aquarium Snapshots: Spring 2014

Musical Magpie

You Know You’ve Been an Animal Care Volunteer a Long Time When…

False Killer Whales!

One Smoothie, with a Cricket Boost!

Happy 17th Birthday, Charlie!

Simply Enriching

Humpbacks Here and Humpbacks There!

Positive Reinforcement: It’s Not Just Fish

Reflections of a Seal Pup

What Would You Like The Otter To Do Instead?

Breachers!

Early Birds Get the Worms

The Many Faces of Brook the Sea Otter

How Do Birds Do That?

A Killer Start to 2014…Again!

Which Otter is That?

Sniffing Around

Spending Christmas Day with the Critters

The Return of the Sperm Whale and the Killer Whales!

Different Strokes for Different Birds

Hugh’s Look Back at 2013

The Most Epic Week of Sightings…Ever!

Julien's avatar

Whale Watching

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Julien

Whales Galore!
A juvenile humpback whale in mid-breach!  | Erik Combs
The flamboyant cuttlefish's mesmerizing stare.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific
A breaching humpback whale on a very recent whale watch! You can see how close the whale was to the guests on board capturing the moment.  | Aquarium of the Pacific
The ID shot that was compare to the sea turtle images on the KPCC and NPR websites to confirm it was the same one from the broadcast.  | Hugh Ryono
Gabi's awesome photo of a lunge feeding fin whale! Here, we can see the whale lunging toward the krill and the left side of the whale coming out of the water with views of the pectoral flipper and fluke!  | Aquarium of the Pacific
Senior Mammalogist Jimmy conjures up a new behavior for Harpo the sea lion using a target pole.  | Hugh Ryono
A passing by blue whale nicknamed 'Delta' due to its airplane-like fluke!  | Erik Combs
Sand Dollar Exhibit  | Hugh Ryono
Harpo the sea lion leaps into the air to catch a Frisbee.

We have made it to the point in summer when whale watch trips are really fantastic! This is what we have been waiting on for months; the blues, fins, minkes, humpbacks, and tons of dolphins are all out and about and even feeding in the same areas! Most of our recent trips have been filled with excitement since multiple species are being seen every day in close proximity to each other. I was able to work on a whale watch last week where we had humpback whales, blue whales, and Pacific white-sided dolphins all in the first hour of the trip! We were very surprised to see Pacific white-sided dolphins since they are a seasonal species of toothed whale that we usually only see in the winter and spring, and they are also one of my favorites!

The huge blues have been out there as well and on some days, we have seen multiple at one time all feeding on krill in one area. There has been a lot of upwelling, which causes a lot of nutrients, like plankton, to dwell at the surface which increases the amount of feeding behavior we see off of our coast every summer. We were wondering what the El Niño event would bring us, and so far, just some much needed rain and some amazing and unusual animal sightings! We are seeing more loggerhead sea turtles, mola molas, and huge dark patches of krill at the surface.

As mentioned in the last blogs, I have been introducing our new photo ID interns for this session, and I would like to introduce last, but not least, David! David is a student at Cal State Long Beach and likes exploring, learning new things, meeting new people, and sharing adventures. He is very passionate about marine life: “Working and volunteering at the Aquarium of the Pacific gave me the chance to get my foot through the door and get a head start in my future career as a marine biologist.” He also mentioned that,

“It is a new adventure everyday as an intern. This experience that I am undergoing is forever in my mind and I’m looking forward to the new experiences that await me at the Aquarium.”

David has taken some great photos while gathering data for our whale research collaboration with Cascadia Research Collective. His photos can be seen above with other great shots from Tim Hammond and Erik Combs from Harbor Breeze.

If you have never been on a whale watch with us, or have been on several, it is a perfect time to come make memories with your friends and family. So click here to see how you can get tickets to join our search for marine life during this beautiful summer we are having in So Cal!

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Hugh's avatar

Animal Updates | Invertebrates | Video | Volunteering

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Hugh

The Flamboyant Cuttlefish
A juvenile humpback whale in mid-breach!  | Erik Combs
The flamboyant cuttlefish's mesmerizing stare.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific
A breaching humpback whale on a very recent whale watch! You can see how close the whale was to the guests on board capturing the moment.  | Aquarium of the Pacific
The ID shot that was compare to the sea turtle images on the KPCC and NPR websites to confirm it was the same one from the broadcast.  | Hugh Ryono
Gabi's awesome photo of a lunge feeding fin whale! Here, we can see the whale lunging toward the krill and the left side of the whale coming out of the water with views of the pectoral flipper and fluke!  | Aquarium of the Pacific
Senior Mammalogist Jimmy conjures up a new behavior for Harpo the sea lion using a target pole.  | Hugh Ryono
A passing by blue whale nicknamed 'Delta' due to its airplane-like fluke!  | Erik Combs
Sand Dollar Exhibit  | Hugh Ryono
Harpo the sea lion leaps into the air to catch a Frisbee.

There are just a few animals at the Aquarium of the Pacific that can cause me to have an affectionate emotional response when I look deep into their eyes; sea otters, sea lions, penguins and flamboyant cuttlefish.

In the Jewels of the Pacific exhibit in the Tropical Pacific Gallery is a group of the most amazing creatures I’ve ever seen on land or sea. Although small, their personalities and abilities are addicting and fascinating. At first glance they may look like a tiny herd of colorful neon glowing rhinos or triceratops walking along the bottom of the exhibit. The color and texture of their bodies continuously changing making them look like an electrical light parade float at Disneyland. Then a blink later they can dramatically change their color and blend into their background looking like a rock. They are called flamboyant cuttlefish and they really live up to their names. It’s also really neat how they will interact with you through the glass of their exhibit. They’ll actually come up and stare at you with their mesmerizing alien-like eyes. You really feel like they are analyzing you. You can’t help but feel a connection with these little critters.

I’ve only recently became aware of these cuttlefish so I went to an expert to learn more about them. Janet Monday is one of the aquarists tasked with caring for the flamboyant cuttlefish. She told me that they are found in the Indo-Pacific region from Indonesia to Northern Australia. They have eight arms which are at the front of their bodies and two clear tentacles that they use to capture prey.

An interesting anecdote is how they also use their tentacles to explore their surroundings. The Aquarium of the Pacific is lucky enough to actually breed flamboyant cuttlefish. Janet said that when they are young they are fed tiny mysid shrimp. Later when they are introduced to larger shrimp to eat they don’t immediately capture them. Instead at first they’ll extend their tentacles out slowly and gently tap the shrimp, seemingly asking the question “Is this food?”

Their cuttlebone, which is used to change the animal’s buoyancy, is smaller than other cuttlefish species which is why they spend most of their time walking along the bottom. This leads to the herd-like scenes described earlier. But instead of imaging how it looks, check out the video I’ve put together and watch the flamboyant cuttlefish in action. Janet was kind enough to narrate the video.

The Flamboyant Cuttlefish
Aquarist Janet is tasked with caring for the flamboyant cuttlefish at the Aquarium of the Pacific.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific
The Flamboyant Cuttlefish
The flamboyant cuttlefish spends most of its time walking on the bottom due to its smaller cuttlebone compared to other species of cuttlefish.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific
The Flamboyant Cuttlefish
The flamboyant cuttlefish uses its two tentacles to capture prey.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific
The Flamboyant Cuttlefish
You can check out the flamboyant cuttlefish in the Jewels of the Pacific exhibit in the Tropical Pacific Gallery at the Aquarium of the Pacific.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific

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Julien's avatar

Animal Updates | Mammals | Education | Whale Watching

Thursday, July 09, 2015

Julien

Sea Turtles and Breaching Whales!
A juvenile humpback whale in mid-breach!  | Erik Combs
The flamboyant cuttlefish's mesmerizing stare.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific
A breaching humpback whale on a very recent whale watch! You can see how close the whale was to the guests on board capturing the moment.  | Aquarium of the Pacific
The ID shot that was compare to the sea turtle images on the KPCC and NPR websites to confirm it was the same one from the broadcast.  | Hugh Ryono
Gabi's awesome photo of a lunge feeding fin whale! Here, we can see the whale lunging toward the krill and the left side of the whale coming out of the water with views of the pectoral flipper and fluke!  | Aquarium of the Pacific
Senior Mammalogist Jimmy conjures up a new behavior for Harpo the sea lion using a target pole.  | Hugh Ryono
A passing by blue whale nicknamed 'Delta' due to its airplane-like fluke!  | Erik Combs
Sand Dollar Exhibit  | Hugh Ryono
Harpo the sea lion leaps into the air to catch a Frisbee.

This month has been super exciting so far with about 18 sightings of blue whales and sightings of breaching baleen whales like minkes, humpbacks, and even fin whales! The seas have continued to be full of life and we have been seeing some interesting animals like big red patches of krill at the surface, huge mola mola’s, and sea turtles!

We were lucky enough to not only see these animals during the trip, but also get some really cool photos. Among the blues, fins, and minkes, we have continued to see humpback whales feeding at the surface, more feeding frenzies, and cow fin and blue whales with their calves! Just a few days ago, those on the boat got a whale of a show with a very active breaching humpback! The Risso’s dolphins have also made a re-appearance. They are squid eaters so they may be around because there is an abundance of food available off our coast at this time. We even saw a few loggerhead sea turtles recently, which is rare in this area! Loggerheads are found in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans as well as the Mediterranean Sea. We don’t see them very often, as many green sea turtles inhabit our local waters and in the San Gabriel River. They have a unique scute pattern on their shell and younger turtles have ridges along their back. Tim Hammond captured some great shots of this turtle!

This week’s blog will be featuring another one of our new whale photo ID interns; Katie! She is currently a junior at the University of Rhode Island, seeking to complete a BS in Marine Biology. In the future, she hopes to work in a research facility working with poisonous and invasive species. She is thrilled to be interning at the Aquarium of the Pacific and partnering with Cascadia Research Collective and Harbor Breeze Cruises. She has already learned so much about data collection and analysis, which is an extremely important part of research. So far, she has seen so many amazing animals.

“My favorite experience was seeing minke, humpback, and a Bryde’s whale while in a pod of an estimated 2000 dolphins. It was only my fourth trip out on the boat and one of the most exciting events to witness. The huge pod of dolphins had driven massive bait balls into an area, creating a feeding frenzy for the whales, birds, and sea lions. I was most excited to see the Bryde’s whale since it is very rare to see one, as there are only supposed to be 12 known whales on our coast. Through this internship, I hope to learn more about research techniques and everything there is to know about our coastal cetaceans.”

We are happy to have Katie on our team and have some of her photos showcased above!

The sun has been shining and more and more blue whales are being seen despite the El Niño season! So, now that the kids are out of school, come out and have an adventure searching for the largest animals on Earth and learning about the animals from our expert Aquarium staff onboard.

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Hugh's avatar

Animal Updates | Turtles | Conservation | Volunteering

Thursday, July 02, 2015

Hugh

Tripod the Urban Sea Turtle
A juvenile humpback whale in mid-breach!  | Erik Combs
The flamboyant cuttlefish's mesmerizing stare.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific
A breaching humpback whale on a very recent whale watch! You can see how close the whale was to the guests on board capturing the moment.  | Aquarium of the Pacific
The ID shot that was compare to the sea turtle images on the KPCC and NPR websites to confirm it was the same one from the broadcast.  | Hugh Ryono
Gabi's awesome photo of a lunge feeding fin whale! Here, we can see the whale lunging toward the krill and the left side of the whale coming out of the water with views of the pectoral flipper and fluke!  | Aquarium of the Pacific
Senior Mammalogist Jimmy conjures up a new behavior for Harpo the sea lion using a target pole.  | Hugh Ryono
A passing by blue whale nicknamed 'Delta' due to its airplane-like fluke!  | Erik Combs
Sand Dollar Exhibit  | Hugh Ryono
Harpo the sea lion leaps into the air to catch a Frisbee.

The sea turtle made famous by KPCC and National Public Radio.

Tripod is a medium to small green sea turtle that calls the San Gabriel River near Long Beach and Seal Beach home. What sets this little turtle apart from others in the colony of sea turtles that reside in this urban river environment is that it’s nationally known.

Tripod became part of a KPCC / National Public Radio feature that was about the sea turtles of the river early this year. During the segment on the Aquarium of the Pacific’s citizen scientists turtle monitoring program Tripod was spotted in distress by one of the volunteers. Fortunately the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Dan Lawson was being interviewed at that moment and he made an impromptu rescue of the fishing line-entangled sea turtle while the NPR reporter watched. After being disentangled Tripod was released back into the river.

Why the name Tripod? This resident turtle is missing one of its rear flippers. The entanglement was on its front flipper, not the rear and was not the cause of the missing flipper. This disability doesn’t seem to have hindered the little critter. Case in point: last week my wife Pam and I spotted Tripod in the river near the Second Street Bridge while taking field notes and photo id shots of the sea turtles. How do we know for sure it was the same sea turtle? Well I took one of my ID shots and matched it with a photo of Tripod on land that was on the National Public Radio website and a video of the rescue that was on the KPCC website. The patterns of the scales on its head, which we used for identification, matched.

Right now the Aquarium of the Pacific and NOAA’s photo ID project is mostly being done by myself and Pam. But in the near future we’re hoping to incorporate more people in the project such as the Aquarium’s Citizen Scientists sea turtle monitoring volunteers to help increase the database of ID images of the sea turtles in the river.

Who knows, we may start giving out more nicknames to these urban sea turtles as we get to know them better.

Tripod the Urban Sea Turtle
Tripod the urban sea turtle is identifiable not just by its missing rear flipper but also from the patterns of the scales on its head.  | Hugh Ryono

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Julien's avatar

Animal Updates | Mammals | Education | Whale Watching

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Julien

The Summer has Begun!
A juvenile humpback whale in mid-breach!  | Erik Combs
The flamboyant cuttlefish's mesmerizing stare.  | Hugh Ryono, Aquarium of the Pacific
A breaching humpback whale on a very recent whale watch! You can see how close the whale was to the guests on board capturing the moment.  | Aquarium of the Pacific
The ID shot that was compare to the sea turtle images on the KPCC and NPR websites to confirm it was the same one from the broadcast.  | Hugh Ryono
Gabi's awesome photo of a lunge feeding fin whale! Here, we can see the whale lunging toward the krill and the left side of the whale coming out of the water with views of the pectoral flipper and fluke!  | Aquarium of the Pacific
Senior Mammalogist Jimmy conjures up a new behavior for Harpo the sea lion using a target pole.  | Hugh Ryono
A passing by blue whale nicknamed 'Delta' due to its airplane-like fluke!  | Erik Combs
Sand Dollar Exhibit  | Hugh Ryono
Harpo the sea lion leaps into the air to catch a Frisbee.

We have officially started blue whale season as of the 22nd of June and we have been seeing some amazing things in the meantime. As mentioned in the last blog, we have been witnessing some incredible feeding frenzies with multiple species all chowing down on small bait fish like anchovies or krill. Fin whales, humpback whales, minkes, and the blues have been spotted feeding alongside dolphins, sea lions and marine birds! Since we have already been spotting some blues, we hope to be able to see many more in the months to come even during this El Niño season.

Some toothed whales were spotted very recently that we have not seen on our whale watch tours in months: the Risso’s dolphins! We were very surprised to see them since they had not been seen in a very long time. Risso’s dolphins are easy to differentiate from our commons and bottlenose dolphins because of their very long pointed dorsal fin and their white scars and rake marks all over their skin. These rake marks are scrapes from the teeth of other Risso’s dolphins and their white exposed skin can be seen under the water since it refracts as a blue color. I happen to be able to be a part of this tour and was so excited to see them since they are one of my favorite dolphins.

One of the most interestingly unusual sightings we had this time was a juvenile Magnificent Frigatebird! They look like albatrosses and are tropical birds that can have a wingspan of up to seven feet wide! Check out the photo that was captured of this unique pelagic bird.

In the blogs to come, we will be introducing new whale photo ID interns and their work. This week we will be highlighting Gabi! She recently received her Master’s in Marine Mammal Science from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and is also a UCSB alumnus. Her passion is cetacean ecological research - particularly communication, behavior, and sociality - and science that supports conservation and management efforts. She’s been pursuing this career for as long as she can remember and is thrilled to have the opportunity this summer to assist the Aquarium and the CRC (Cascadia Research Collective) with their research on the largest animals on the planet.

“I hope that their work (CRC) helps protect these species against challenges they face now and in the future and that the brief moments I capture of these incredible creatures can help inspire another generation of passionate and curious individuals.” - Gabi

You can see some of Gabi’s photos, along with Erik Combs and Tim Hammonds excellent photos with this week’s blog, so check them out.

The weather is warming up and the tours are now a half hour longer (leaving dock at 12:00 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.) which gives us plenty of time to enjoy the sun and all of the wildlife our coast has to offer! So, come on out and spend your summer learning and experience these animals in their natural habitat.

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